The Evidence of Film and the Presence of the World: Jean-Luc Nancy's Cinematic Ontology

Following Deleuze's theory, the emergence of the "time-image" following the Second World War led to (our relationship to) the world disappearing from film. Following Jean-Luc Nancy, the Iranian film-maker Abbas Kiarostami is a privileged witness to a cinema that liberates itself from a "postmodern" obsession with the disappearance of the world. Nancy reveals three foci of cinema: the look, the movement and the real (the world). The "alethic" (Heidegger) look is "mobilized" by cinema; it forces us to remain in contemplative and mental motion. In experiences of evidence the cinema presents us "the real" (Lacan). In Früchtl's article, he argues that cinema is not merely the ontological celebration of presence, but the aesthetic celebration of a tension generating and suspended difference: between presence and its re-presentation. The evidence of cinema thus is the mediated result of an interactive, even playful relationship of our dimensions of experience. What opens is a space full of possible meanings, a textual web which only takes shape with time and with the help of the subject providing meaning.

Author Name: 
Früchtl, Josef
Journal: 
Critical Studies
Citation: 
Früchtl, Josef. "The Evidence of Film and the Presence of the World: Jean-Luc Nancy's Cinematic Ontology." Critical Studies 32 (2010): 193-201, 238.